If you are an author of a law school casebook, with a non-traditional publisher, CALI would like to hear from you.

⁦The Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (CALI) is conducting a survey to help faculty and students identify teaching and learning resources that are available for free online or available at low cost from non-traditional publishers.

If you are the author of a teaching resource, please fill out the form below. The information will be collected and disseminated within the legal education community through the CALI website as a complement to its eLangdell® Press offerings.


With over 30 free, CC-licensed, peer-reviewed casebooks eLangdell Press is a leading publisher of OER materials in legal education. Visit the CALI bookstore at cali.org/eLangdell for details.

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CALI Mini-Course Session 1 “Creating a Successful Online Course” is available to view on-demand

In case you missed the first live session, “Creating a Successful Online Course“, of the CALI 7 session mini-course entitled Preparing for the Future of Legal Education – Online Teaching Tips & Techniques , it is now posted to view on-demand. We’re recording all of the sessions and will post them to course website the day after they happen.

Click here for access to the recording and presentation materials.

Session Description:

Welcome to the first session, “Creating a Successful Online Course.” We’re not covering everything you need to know to create an online course in 75 minutes. However, we hope to lay a foundation for future sessions and to inspire you to start thinking creatively about your courses.

We are pleased to welcome Tanya Joosten, Ph.D., Director, Digital Learning R&D, DETA Research Center, University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee, as our first speaker.

Learning Outcomes

At the conclusion of this session you should be able to:
1. Distinguish Emergency Remote Teaching from Online Teaching.
2. Describe a success from Emergency Remote Teaching.
3. Examine the pros and cons of teaching your course synchronously vs. asynchronously.
4. List two ways you want to change your course if it’s taught online in fall.

Click here for access to the recording and presentation materials.

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CALI EMERGENCY REMOTE TEACHING LAW FACULTY SURVEY

CALI EMERGENCY REMOTE TEACHING LAW FACULTY SURVEY

Add your voice to the conversation

We’re just finishing the largest distance learning experiment in legal education history.

However, what you accomplished was not true distance learning. It was Emergency Remote Teaching. You didn’t have time to plan, create new materials, train, or set up the infrastructure. Still, you learned a lot and have experiences that are worth reflecting on.

That is the goal of this survey.

We want to hear from US Law Faculty (there will be a separate law student survey) who moved from face-to-face to online teaching during Spring 2020 due to the pandemic. The survey is anonymous, but we want to know where you teach. If there are enough respondents, we will share law school-specific results with your school’s CALI contact. Aggregate results will be shared with everyone.

CALI is working on some projects to help the larger law school academy prepare for an entirely or partially online school year in Fall 2020 and the survey results will help guide our work.

If you would like to share your experiences for the benefit of other faculty, consider submitting a video for the CALI Conference.  See 2020.calicon.org for more details.

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Call for 15 Minute CALIcon2020 Presentations

PANDEMIC + LEGAL EDUCATION + TECH: WHAT’S YOUR STORY?
CALL FOR 15-MINUTE CALICON2020 PRESENTATIONS

We all experienced the largest experiment in Remote Emergency Teaching in history.  Law faculty scrambled to learn new software, librarians scrambled to deliver services and answer reference questions, Teknoids delivered laptops and provided tech support to all.  Instructional Designers and Ed Techies scrambled to make the pedagogy and curriculum make sense.  Deans and administrators scrambled too.  Lots of scrambling!  Time to share your recipes.

Fall semester is going to be another story – and one that we will tell – but what can we learn from Spring 2020?  We want you to capture the insights, the failures, the lessons, the experiences you all had during the Great Remote Emergency Teaching of 2020.  In the spirit of an online conference, we require your presentation to work within these constraints…

  1. 15 minutes of video submitted by May 15, 2020.

  2. Cover any topic that relates to Pandemic + Legal Education + Tech.

On May 21, 2020, we will assemble your presentations into clusters around similar topics and pick three to present LIVE during the conference on June 3rd, 4th, and 5th, 2020.  There will be three clusters of sessions each day for a total of 9 hours.  One or two of those hours might be used for keynote talks – we’ll have to see what we get.  That means there will be 21 to 24 fifteen minute talks.  The last 15 minutes of the hour will be held over to polls, Q & A and discussion.

All of your experiences are valuable and interesting.  This is an opportunity to capture your experiences and share them.  If we don’t select you for a live presentation, we will still post your video to the conference website.  This is the asynchronous part of the conference – it’s the long tail.

No need to get approval from us before creating your 15-minute video.  Panels are acceptable.  Interviewer + Guest/Q & A formats are wonderful too.  Here are some topics I would really like to see people discuss – just to whet your whistles…

  • How did you use Breakout Rooms in Zoom and to What Effect?

  • Debate: Live online lecture vs. Recorded lecture

  • What’s the best camera, lighting, laptop, setup for law faculty?

  • Best Practices for Rolling Out Loaner Laptops

  • Things I Would Have Done to Prepare If I Had Time

    • Faculty version

    • Librarian version

    • Teknoid version

  • How awesome was it to assign awesome CALI lessons?

  • Law Student Voices of the Pandemic (Yes, we want sessions from law students!

  • Managing Multiple Communication Channels – email, slack, chat, text, zoom, etc, etc.

  • How did law school IT handle bandwidth, security, streaming?

  • How did you engage with students beyond talking to a camera?

Everyone has experiences.  Take a moment and reflect on yours and share.

Register and submit your videos at  http://2020.calicon.org/

“See” You in June!
John Mayer
@johnpmayer
jmayer@cali.org
Executive Director, CALI

Conference Registration:

CALIcon2020 Virtual Conference General Admission:  FREE

What’s a conference without a schwag bag? We felt the same way. That’s why we’re offering a special box filled with fun items for your enjoyment.

Happy Fun Time Conference Schwag Box Contents: $25.00 

  • Light-up yo-yo
  • Fidget Cube
  • T-shirt
  • Build Your Own Badge Kit
  • Coloring Book
  • Conference Snacks
  • and more!

You will be redirected to an Eventbrite page to complete your registration.

Thank you to our Sponsors

 

 

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CALIcon 2020 Conference Going to a Virtual Format

Hello Fellow Zoomers,

Obviously, we are canceling the in-person CALI Conference that was scheduled for       June 4-5, 2020 in Chicago.  In the spirit of Chicago’s former Mayor, I, John Mayer (see what I did there) am not going to waste this crisis.  We are going to make lemonade out of these lemons and still have fun doing it.  Here’s the plan.

CALIcon – The Pandemic Edition

June 3-4-5, 2020 at 1 pm, 3 pm and 5 pm for 1 hour at each time.

Optional Happy Fun Time Conference Swag Box ($25 + shipping and handling).

We will be putting out a brand new, clean slate Call For Speakers soon.  We want you to do a 15 minute pre-recorded session on some topic related to Pandemic + Legal Education + Tech.   This can be a screencast, interpretive dance, podcast, Zoom panel discussion – whatever you want, but you have to record it and upload it to us by Midnight on Friday, May 15, 2020.

We will choose 18 of these and assemble them into clusters of three presentations.

We are in the midst of the largest distance learning experiment in legal education history.  Everyone – faculty, students, Teknoids, law librarians, edtech folks – everyone – has experienced it differently and had to make adjustments or witnessed a rapid change.  We want you to talk about that.  How’d it go?  Does this mean real, permanent change for legal education?  What did you learn?  If you could go back in time to December 2019, what advice would you give yourself?  You get the idea.

Here’s what the conference calendar will look like

Wednesday, June 3, 2020 –

1:00 pm – Opening Welcome + Keynote

2:00 pm – Break – eat a snack from your Happy Fun Time Schwag Box (hereafter HFTSB)

3:00 pm – 4:00 pm Live Sessions around some major topic

3:00 pm – Live session 1
3:15 pm – Live Session 2
3:30 pm – Live Session 3
3:45 pm – Q & A with all the speakers

4:00 pm – Break – HFTSB Snack and play with your CALI YoYo

5:00 pm – Live sessions around one major topic

5:00 pm – Live Session 1
5:15 pm – Live Session 2
5:30 pm – Live Session 3
5:45 pm – Q & A with all the speakers

6:30 pm -? –  Grab a libation from the fridge and join the Safe Distance Happy Happy Hour and demonstrations of yo-yo tricks.

Same plan for Thursday, June 4 and Friday, June 5.  After the last session on Friday, we will hold a raffle for a bunch of weird, cool, fun geek gadgets for anyone who paid $25 for a Happy Fun Time Schwag Box.

Everyone who submits a session will have it posted on the website.  Some will be asked to reprise their session – Live – during one of the cluster sessions during the conference.  This lets people attend what they want, but retains a modicum of a real-time rush to keep things interesting.  The Happy Fun Time Schwag Box will have a variety of conference schwag, a t-shirt, snacks, name badge, and some surprises.

Let’s have fun with this!

Regards                                                                                                                                                   John Mayer
Executive Director, CALI
jmayer@cali.org
Follow me on Twitter: @johnpmayer
Follow CALI on Twitter:  @caliorg

 

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Resources for Law Faculty On Teaching and Coronavirus / Covid-19

Last update 3/11/2020

I have seen many law schools and law faculty sharing information, tutorials, videos, and other information related to maintaining continuity of legal education by moving courses online.  This webpage collects those resources and will be updated.  If you have something or see something you think should be on this page, email me – John Mayer/jmayer@cali.org or DM on Twitter @johnpmayer – and I will post.

VIDEO TUTORIALS

Tracy Norton/Touro Law posted this to HYBRIDJDS@listserv.touro.edu listserv on 3/10/2020

As promised, I’ve recorded several videos to help out with teaching online generally and using Zoom specifically. The first two are quick how-tos on equipment that could be helpful and features that help you and your space look camera ready. 

The last two are different recordings of a single conversation between me, Ann Nowak (Touro Law Writing Center Director) and Lynne Kramer (Touro Law Professor, trial ad and negotiations) in which we talk about some practical tips that aren’t covered in most help videos. We also talk about using different features for different types of classroom activities. Ann talks about her very interactive online Law Practice Management course as well as individual meetings for the Writing Center. Lynne talks about trial ad and negotiation exercises. I talk about writing courses and feedback conferences. The first of these videos is what Zoom recorded and is, mostly, what participants would have seen. The second of these videos is a screencast so you can see what I was seeing as I moderated the conversation and how I accessed the different features. At one point, I accidentally leave the Zoom room, so the Zoom video records what Lynne was saying while the screencast does not, because I wasn’t there. 

Video 1: Equipment Setup (6 min, 14 sec) – https://youtu.be/7_R4UhSAEEY

Video 2: Zoom Feature for Sprucing Up Your Appearance and Your Space (3 min, 43 sec) – https://youtu.be/p0M4kSk2ozk

Video 3: Zoom Recording of a Conversation Sharing Practical Tips (1 hour, 2 minutes) – https://youtu.be/2BueUNvH_oI

Video 4: Screencast Recording of a Conversation Sharing Practical Tips (same conversation as Video 3, just from the moderator’s perspective) ) (58 minutes, 23 sec))  – Recorded Using Camtasia – https://youtu.be/Xyp7oyIhA0c

Making the Shift to Online Learning: Emergency Preparedness & Instructional Continuity – Video – Online Learning Consortium

Using Live, Online Sessions to Support Continuity of Instruction – Video – Online Learning Consortium


CALI RESOURCES 

(Go here to find out who has the authorization code for your law school)

ASYNCHRONOUS, INTERACTIVE, SELF-PACED TUTORIALS

CALI Lessons are the original distance learning.  There are over 1000 lessons covering 40 different legal subject areas.  A good bet is to look at the Subject Outline for the course you are teaching, find the specific topics you are teaching and assign those lessons to your students.  Here is a quick list of CALI’s Subject Outlines with links to CALI Lessons.  CALI Lessons take 25-45 minutes to complete, so you could replace part of a class by requiring a lesson and use online time to discuss questions.  Contact Deb Quentel – dquentel@cali.org with questions.

TRACKING STUDENT PROGRESS / FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT

If you want to track students running lessons and see their scores, then use LessonLink to create a unique URL.  When students run a CALI Lesson using your LessonLink , you can see their scores and get an analytics report by students and questions.  You can download the data to an Excel spreadsheet too.  Contact Elmer Masters – emasters@cali.org with questions.

PODCASTS

Tell your students about our podcasts.  We have over 70 podcasts – mostly in Contracts and Secured Transactions.  You can find them here.

POLLING THE CLASS ONLINE/REAL-TIME

If you are teaching online using Zoom or GoToWebinar, you can poll your students using Instapoll.  This is a free service where you go to Instapoll, create a new poll and then give your students the Pin #.  They go to Instapoll and answer your verbal question.  You see the results.  No one has to login – it’s INSTANT!  You can clear the results and re-use the same poll or create a new poll – as many as you want.

FREE CASEBOOKS / SUPPLEMENTAL READINGS

CALI publishes free casebooks and textbooks that you and your students can view and download for free.  These books are Creative Commons Licensed, so you can download the PDF, ebook or even the Microsoft Word file.  See our bookstore here. 


ADVICE FROM LAW PROFESSORS

Excellent LibGuide here from University of Washington Law


Thoughts for Law Professors Contemplating Moving to Virtual Classes – Allie Robbins/CUNY Law


Tips for Teaching Law Classes Online in the Event of a COVID-19 Shut Down of Law Schools – Bridget Crawford/Pace Law


Teaching a Live Synchronous Distance Learning Course: A Student-Focused Approach – Ellen Podgor/Stetson


From the Civpro listserv (From Professor Angela Upchurch/Southern Illinois University Law)

Synchronized communication – If you want to host a class or discussion live online with your students, you might consider using Zoom or Join.me.  I have used Join.me for a course and found it easy to use the screen sharing function with my students.  I have instructions for helping students use Join.me and would be happy to share those with anyone who contacts me off-list. (aupchurch@siu.edu) Currently, Zoom is offering an extended use of its free trial platform to K-12 educators (I don’t know if they will extend this to University users). https://zoom.us/docs/ent/school-verification.html

Unsynchronized communication (video uploads and discussion boards) – I wrote a short description on how to create simple online videos using free or low-cost programs – https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2711773  (NOTE: OfficeMix is no longer offering educational services, but the information regarding the free tool www.screencastomatic.com is still relevant).

Streamlined version of online  “office hours” or other group meetings without video – In the past, I have offered online “office hours” via the Live Discussion feature on TWEN.  You can set a time where students can log into the Live Discussion (and you can password protect it if you want to only have certain groups/individuals join).  This allows you to have an instant-message chat board on which to interact with your students.  My students have really liked this feature in the past and I know friends at other schools who have the same experience.  You don’t experience the time-delay associated with traditional message board discussions (or the hassle of a long email chain).  However, you don’t have to be “camera” ready (as you do with video chat options and you don’t have to speak if that isn’t optimal) which helps if people are not feeling well.  Also, TWEN automatically creates a final transcript  that all students can see, including those who aren’t able to join you “live.”

I’ve also used Zoom and the WL live discussion.  OF the two, Zoom better mimics the classroom, the “live discussion” feature is super-handy and easy to use.   I regularly use it for office hours for 1Ls-3Ls and find some students actually prefer it to traditional office hours since they can be anywhere they have an internet connection and get a transcript.


From Susan Giles/Capital University Law

For faculty who might be making plans that include teaching Civil Procedure remotely, Carolina Academic Press is offering a discounted use of Click & Learn: Civil Procedure (Upchurch, Gilles & Ho).  This fully online tool is “turn-key” ready and can either be used to provide complete, self-contained instruction to law students or can be used to supplement any other online teaching faculty intend to provide.  With over 2,000 questions Click & Learn guides students through the vast majority of topics covered in Civil Procedure courses, without stripping the rigor out of the course.  The students test their understanding as they go, answering questions ranging from basic to mastery level, and receiving feedback and explanations instantly.  From the teacher dashboard, faculty can set any assignment as required or simply recommended.  Click & Learn also allows faculty to track student performance (individually or as a class) and focus online outreach on those topics where the class is struggling.  Faculty members can receive a free account to review Click & Learn at www.clickandlearnguide.com (click purchase).

Students will receive discounted use  ($19.95) through the Access Code:  ATHOME20.  This code would provide students with access to Click & Learn for the remainder of the semester regardless of when they return to face-to-face class sessions.


A Student’s Guide to ‘Working From Home  – Imran Malek/Boston U Law 3L


ADVICE FROM ACADEMICS/NOT LAW 

Learning in a Pandemic – 1 – Jim Luke/Lansing Community College
Learning in a Pandemic -2

Law Schools Shift Classes Online Amid COVID-19, But Can They Do It Successfully? – Karen Sloan


Let’s Talk About “Shifting an Entire University Online as Disaster Preparedness”… – Matt Crosslin


How to Be a Better Online Teacher – ADVICE GUIDE – Flower Darby/Chronicle of Higher Education


RELEVANT TWITTER THREADS

Justin Reich – https://twitter.com/bjfr/status/1237396249189298177

@grandeped –  https://twitter.com/grandeped/status/1234831562069377024 

@profjmale – https://twitter.com/ProfJMale/status/1237155808464588800

@socmediaJD – https://twitter.com/socmediaJD/status/1237952603260149761

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Registration is NOW OPEN for #CALIcon2020!

AGENTS OF INNOVATION

Great ideas, new technology, and innovative teaching methods are all part and parcel of the 30th Annual CALI Conference for Law School Computing, but nothing is easy and making it work in our home institutions is up to us.  We must be our own Agents of Innovation.  “Agency” is a particularly appropriate word.  We must give agency to our students so that they can construct their own educational journeys, we must give agency to our faculty through tools, websites, content, and support so they can teach at the top of their talent and we must be agents of change in legal education to build a better justice system.  CALIcon is the community of legal education agents – staff, faculty and law librarians – sharing experiences, discussing projects, demoing tech.  Come join us.

THE 30TH ANNUAL CALI CONFERENCE FOR LAW SCHOOL COMPUTING RETURNS TO WHERE IT ALL BEGAN! JOIN US JUNE 4TH & 5TH, 2020 AT CHICAGO-KENT COLLEGE OF LAW IN CHICAGO IL FOR THIS SPECIAL 30TH ANNIVERSARY VERSION OF CALICON!

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The Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (CALI) announces the second round of CALI Lessons produced by the Law School Success Fellowship.

The Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (CALI) announces the second round of CALI Lessons produced by the Law School Success Fellowship. The Fellowship is comprised of members of the academic success community from U.S. law schools. The goal of the Fellowship is to author CALI lessons to develop students’ critical-thinking skills and prepare them to handle the unique demands of law school.


CALI FELLOWSHIPS

The CALI Fellowships Project is a multi-year applied research effort to create computer-based learning materials in legal education. Both the process and the product will benefit faculty and CALI member institutions. The resulting materials will be peer-reviewed by members of the CALI Editorial Board and published to law schools as part of the CALI Library of Materials. The goal of the project is to create a high-quality pool of electronic teaching materials for faculty to supplement their courses, locally customize for specific instructional goals, and explore computer-mediated/distance learning in legal education.

Click here to view the past and present Fellowships Projects.

The Fellowship was created with the support of a grant from AccessLex Institute.

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The Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (CALI) announces the appointment of three new board directors

The Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (CALI) announces the appointment of three new board directors in addition to the slate of directors re-elected. All CALI Board members are unpaid volunteers for a three-year term effective January 1, 2020. 

“We are very excited to have this incredible group of individuals joining CALI’s Board of Directors. They bring with them a diverse experience that will enhance our mission and help CALI strengthen our position in the legal education/technology industry,” said Kristina Niedringhaus, President, CALI Board of Directors.

Rory Bahadur (Professor of Law) Washburn University School of Law, Browne Lewis (Dean) School of Law at North Carolina Central University, and Corinne St. Claire (Assistant Director of Instructional Design & Technology) Loyola Law School – Los Angeles are the three newly elected directors. 

Departing the CALI board is Scott Burnham (Professor of Law) Gonzaga University School of Law, Michael Robak (Director of the Schoenecker Law Library, Associate Dean and Clinical Professor of Law) University of St. Thomas (MN) School of Law, and Jame Smith (John Byrd Martin Chair of Law Emeritus) University of Georgia School of Law. “It has been a real pleasure working with these amazing individuals.  Thanks to their dedication and leadership, CALI has accomplished several projects to help how law faculty teach and law students learn,” said John Mayer, Executive Director, CALI.

A listing of the new Board and Committee members can be found on our website at https://www.cali.org/content/cali-board-directors.

 

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CALI Law School Success Fellows Releases New CALI Lessons

The Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (CALI) announces the first round of CALI Lessons produced by the Law School Study Skills Fellowship. The Fellowship is comprised of members of the academic success community from U.S. law schools. The goal of the Fellowship is to author CALI lessons to develop students’ critical-thinking skills and prepare them to handle the unique demands of law school.

CALI FELLOWSHIPS

The CALI Fellowships Project is a multi-year applied research effort to create computer-based learning materials in legal education. Both the process and the product will benefit faculty and CALI member institutions. The resulting materials will be peer-reviewed by members of the CALI Editorial Board and published to law schools as part of the CALI Library of Materials. The goal of the project is to create a high-quality pool of electronic teaching materials for faculty to supplement their courses, locally customize for specific instructional goals, and explore computer-mediated/distance learning in legal education.

Click here to view past, present and current schedule of Fellowships Projects.

The Fellowship was created with the support of a grant from AccessLex Institute.

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